Donating my hair.

Thursday, 30 August 2018

Back in 2015, we were heading off for a fortnight all inclusive in the beautiful Dominican Republic, when I realised that my bottom length extremely thick hair was going to be hard to handle in the heat!


Copyright Life with Liv



My hair has a tendency to expand width ways in any heat or humidity and the sheer weight of it would cause a headache if restrained into a ponytail. So I made the decision to cut it off to save me the time and worry of styling and trying to calm the frizz while away.

I felt it was such a shame to waste all of my hair that would be cut off, after seeing two members of my family suffer terribly with a hair loss condition called alopecea, I really became aware of how your hair makes you feel as a person.

If you think about it, it can give you confidence when it looks good, it can be used to hide behind like my Mum and a way to express your taste.

It’s quite devastating to have that taken away from you suddenly. Both of my relatives were young women, one lost small patches of her hair which she was extremely conscious about covering and the other simply lost her hair. Virtually over night. All of it.

I mentioned this to a friend one morning over coffee and she asked me if I had thought of donating my hair to the Little Princess trust. I looked them up and discovered that they provide real hair wigs free of chargers children and young adults up to the age of 24, who have lost their hair due to cancer treatments and other illnesses. They do this with human hair donations which means they look very realistic and are able to be styled too.

So, the date was arranged, the hairdresser looked a little pale when I told her my plan and kept asking if I was sure! A few snips later I had just over 18 inches of hair in my hand ready to package up and post.

Copyright Life with Liv



If you are thinking of donating, here are some guidelines from Little Princess Trust:

Hair we are able to use: 

Clean, dry hair in good condition (no split ends) from any gender, and of any natural colour
Straight, wavy, curly, permed or chemically straightened
Containing the occasional grey (less than 10%)
Dyed, bleached/highlighted (any dyes must be of a natural colour)
Ponytails(s) cut a long time ago, preserved in good condition





My then 3 year old was amazed and said I was like Rapunzel in Tangled now!

While I was looking into the different options, I found out that The Harley street clinic are providing a new hair loss treatment called a FUE procedure which is essentially a very clever hair transplant.

If like me you are wondering “How does a Hair transplant work"  I can tell you a little about it.

What is FUE?


FUE (follicular unit extraction) is hair transplant surgery. It involves extracting individual hair follicles from a donor area of the patients body - usually the sides and back of the head, which 
are then implanted in the areas that are affected. 

How does it work?

During the process, individual follicles – typically between 1 and 4 hairs – are removed under local anaesthesia. The extraction procedure utilises a micro surgical extraction instrument, between 0.6mm and 1.0mm in diameter, to remove the follicles.

The surgeon, using specialist micro surgical needles, then punctures the scalp area that is to receive the grafts. The surgeons at Harley Street Clinic are experts at blending the hair in, inserting the grafts at an angle and density that matches the original hair, so it will resemble a natural and realistic hair pattern, permanently.

How long does it take?

The length of time for an FUE procedure varies depending on how many grafts are needed. A smaller procedure, where only around 200 grafts are needed, can be completed in a couple of hours. However, a larger procedure of around 2,500 to 3,000 grafts will require a session that stretches over two days.

It tends to be more time consuming than strip surgery, but does not leave the obvious and typical scars that strip surgery does.

It's great to know these options are out there, I will definitely be passing on my findings to anyone I know struggling with hair loss.